Cookies on Knowhow Nonprofit

We use cookies in order for parts of Knowhow Nonprofit to work properly, and also to collect information about how you use the site. We use this information to improve the site and tailor our services to you. For more, see our page on privacy and data protection.

OK

Skip to content. | Skip to navigation

Community-made content which you can improve Case study from our community

HOW TO USE YOUR EVALUATION FINDINGS TO IMPROVE YOUR WORK

Evaluating projects, programmes – or even the work of your whole organization – can be a transformational step in making sure the work you do is of the highest quality, making it as effective as possible, based on robust evidence.

Without a focus on improvement and learning, evaluation becomes a tick-box exercise; something that has to be done to please someone else. Used effectively, your findings can shape the work you do in the future and focus attention on how to achieve your intended outcomes and impact. In short, it can bring you closer to realising the change your organisation wants to see. 

 

1

Share your learning with others

While you may have guided the process from the beginning, this might be the first time other people involved with your organisation hear about your evaluation. Sharing your learning is an important part of the process – for transparency, accountability and so you can plan how to improve.

Think about who needs to know about your evaluation. Not everyone involved with your organisation necessarily needs to know all your evaluation findings; what is useful to your trustees might not be what your volunteers want to hear about. Evaluations don’t always draw big crowds, so be creative – consider a lunchtime session for staff, a blog or short video for your supporters, or a paper summary for trustees.

 

Further information

While you may have guided the process from the beginning, this might be the first time other people involved with your organisation hear about your evaluation. Sharing your learning is an important part of the process – for transparency, accountability and so you can plan how to improve.

Think about who needs to know about your evaluation. Not everyone involved with your organisation necessarily needs to know all your evaluation findings; what is useful to your trustees might not be what your volunteers want to hear about. Evaluations don’t always draw big crowds, so be creative – consider a lunchtime session for staff, a blog or short video for your supporters, or a paper summary for trustees.

 

Contributors

Page last edited Dec 06, 2017 History

Help us to improve this page – give us feedback.

1 star 2 stars 3 stars 4 stars 5 stars 3.1/5 from 54 ratings